First of all, a brief belated statement on the First Ever TBA Farms Grow-It Kill-It Eat-It Jazz-Run Cold-Toes Pass-the-Whiskey Festival: A gigantic THANK YOU to all who attended -- your interest, support, questions and ideas were nothing short of inspiring (new business plan, coming soon!). It was amazing to see folks from all walks of our lives mingling over chicken killing, brussels harvesting, (endless) chopping, pit digging, pig roasting, table setting, and, finally, feasting. There were fireworks and America and sequins and oratory. And we have only you amazing folks to thank for that. You can all come back any time.

And, I swear that I will gather pictures together soon (ahem, all who took pictures: can I steal them from facebook?? Can you email them to me????)

But, among all the excited ruminating on the Feast and our parsing of ideas and future plannings, as those who lingered know, life moves on quickly at the farm.


The boar, no longer content with his monk's existence, pulled a Great Escape-inspired tunneling maneuver sometime in the wee hours of Wednesday. I managed to lure him back in, but not before (and don't ask how I know this) he had clearly done, well, exactly what we want him to do, with one of the Big Pig ladies. He just got to it about a month early. Big Man and I spent the rest of the week wondering how fruitful his exploit had been, and hemming and hawing over whether to stick to the original plan or to just go all in and shoot for a cluster of piglets, albeit a month too soon in the spring.

But then he solved the problem for us, by getting out again on Saturday morning. This is what the fence looked like after we fixed it:

It was clear that nothing short of castration would keep him away from the Juliets. So, the new release date for piglets appears to be late February, 2011. And I suppose we need to start bustling about, stockpiling pickles, watermelons and a variety of ice creams for expectant ladies.

Also in the leitmotif of things growing where you can't see them, Garden 2011 has officially started. Garlic.


Admittedly, not much to look at yet, and neither are the presumed piglets. But it's somehow very satisfying to have things already growing, just as the rest of us are retiring for a semi-hibernation full of casseroles, novels and network tv.